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what a miracle!

6 Nov

It’s autumn for real now. Took a stroll down to Wreck Beach this evening and half the leaves are brown and gold and some of them were falling as we walked. I know I should be panicking at the season change since it’s going to bring the unending rain we’ve been warned about but so far it’s been just lovely. At home you only get those crisp days when it’s cold enough to see your breath, here we’ve had a whole week of them and I haven’t had to wear a coat once.

We’ve ticked a few more typical Canadian experiences off the list. Two weeks ago it was Thanksgiving here and one of the girls volunteered to cook a traditional Thanksgiving dinner- turkey, stuffing, yams, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, gravy, pumpkin pie (which I did NOT expect to like but in the event it was pretty spectacular, ditto the pecan pie), the whole shebang- it was epic! We all brought along our own food contributions too, Kirsty and I volunteered to make a veggie dish, take a look at the recipe below, it’s a variation on a bbcgoodfood classic. When all of the food had been laid out on the table (feast is the word!) and 15 or so ravenous exchange people were just about to lay into it, one of our cooks asked us all to stand and give thanks- you know, that tradition that’s supposed to be the point of the day! I know it sounds a bit cringey but it was actually really lovely and I think having a holiday that’s all about stopping for a minute and being grateful for what you have is a brilliant idea. I like to think that i don’t take the things in my life for granted and I really believe in telling the people you love how much you appreciate them and how much they matter. If it’s something you don’t do often enough or haven’t done lately Thanksgiving is a good time to step back and remember that really life is pretty good. I also really like that it’s a secular holiday, I mean almost all of the big occasions in the Irish calendar are linked to Christianity, and I guess that makes sense since we’re a pretty homogeneous little country but some people do get left out and at Thanksgiving nobody does because it’s just about eating a massive meal and hanging out with your family, which are things universally enjoyed.

The wonderful dinner came at the tail end of a really fantastic weekend so we had that to be thankful for. We went on a bit of an adventure through the Fraser valley and up to Adams River in search of the spawning sockeye salmon. Every 4 years masses of them swim upstream to the exact spot where they were born to lay their eggs and then they die. It’s strange that salmon have no parent-child relationship, who do they blame all of their problems on when they reach adulthood?

The trip was a truly marvellous laugh. It was Crazybones brainchild- she’d heard about these determined salmon, and that at a certain point somewhere east or north of Vancouver there were so many that they filled whole river. So 5 of us packed off in a rented car with only a vague notion of where we were going and limited knowledge of how to get there. We drove until we hit a small town called Hope. I know- it sounds like the name of a sitcom. And it did have a certain Twin Peaks vibe. Its an unassuming little place, petrol stations, a dairy queen, a couple of shops and bars a very ordinary place in an extraordinary setting- it sits nestled in the shadow of the massive, splendid mountains and the Fraser River thunders along its edge- yet the town is so normal looking, it barely seems to notice its impressive surrounds, if it does it just carries on regardless, minding its own business. When I told people we had visited their faces took on almost sympathetic expressions ‘there wouldn’t be much to do at night in Downtown Hope huh?’. Actually there is rather a lot, Friday night in Hope was one of the funnest I’ve spent in Canada!

It started off with a sign that read ‘karaoke at the Eagles, guests welcome’, assuming the Eagles was a pub we made our way up there, post a pleasant dinner and a few glasses of Naked Grape, only to learn from a lady in the Car Park that the Eagles was not a bar at all but the local headquarters of an organisation called the Fraternal Order of  Eagles. The old FOE is a social club with a charitable message which claims responsibility for Mother’s Day, Friday karaoke was buzzing with Hope’s most high profile FOE members. The sign had told us guests were welcome but that was a little bit of a misrepresentation- members like members you see, luckily we bumped into one of the more fun loving of these just outside the Eagles and she signed us in as her responsibilities (if we’d behaved badly she would have been banned for a month). Luckily we were a hit, breaking the ice with a lively rendition of Proud Mary complete with frenetic dancing and crowd participation. Having gotten ourselves nicely warmed out we continued to roll out the hits until closing (partly because Naomi kept signing us up to sing without telling us, hence a mystified me being called away from a hilarious chat to belt out Billy Rae Cyrus’ Achie Breaky heart….cringe and off key don’t begin to cover it). Afterwards Darlene and Naomi, our new best friends in Hope led us to the Gold Rush, the main meeting point of Hope’s hot young things where we got more chances to dance like mentals and generally soak up the place’s brilliance.

Over the next 2 days salmon hunting began in earnest. They had been and gone from the Fraser Valley so on the advice of the man who runs the river rafting in those parts we headed further north towards Kamloops to the Adam’s River. The journey took us through a variety of landscapes and from the windows of the car we saw some breath taking things. On plenty of occassions we hopped out to take snaps like this one

Popped by Coquihalla national Park to see the Othello tunnels, a line of tunnels (as you may have guessed) that were blasted through the granite walls of a canyon by Andrew McCullough,  a mad, visionary 19th century engineer. He was like a human salmon really, chasing that impossible dream, finding a way nobody thought he could! In his case the mission was to bring a railway to Kootenay BC and the only way was through the canyon. He pretty much risked life and limb to do it and in the event the train only ran that way for a couple of decades. His legacy is still there, the tunnels draw plenty of tourists for a gander (us among them obviously) , but somehow I don’t think that would be any consolation. Sure he’s immortalised, but I reckon he’d rather be relevant.

After another sleep and many more miles of driving in a confused manner we finally made it to salmon. We arrived at the Salute to the Sockeye festival at 8 o’clock on Sunday morning, entirely exhausted but eager to see the fish at the end of their rather more draining journey. As we got near the smell hit us: the salmon who’d already made it, spawned and said goodbye. At the time I thought the whole thing was incredibly sad. They swim all this way, overcome enormous obstacles, finally make it and then die, leaving their little orphan babies to face the same thing in 4 years time. Actually it’s kind of awesome. You’re born without parents. You learn all there is to know about being a salmon from instinct and just live your life without any of the responsibilities of dependents (aging parents or parasitic children) then when you feel it’s time to grow up and enter the mature stage of life you get to head off on this ridiculous adventure with all the other salmon from your generation, leave behind a load of eggs and never worry what becomes of them. Might be the best life cycle ever. Stupid lucky salmon!

Vegetarian Shepherd’s Pie with Sweet potato mash

400g tin of lentils

400g tin of chopped tomatoes

1 red pepper, deseeded and chopped

1 onion, chopped

3 cloves garlic, chopped

2 courgettes cut into chunks

butternut squash cut into chunks

2 fairly big sweet potatoes peeled and cut into chunks

3 carrots cut into chunks,

2 tsp oregano

a chunk of ginger, the size of 2 thumbnails I reckon, grated or chopped

25g butter

cheddar

Boil the sweet potato in a saucepan until tender. Drain and mash with the butter and season to your heart’s content.Meanwhile fry the garlic, onion and ginger in a  little oil until the onions are tender. Then add the carrots, water, tomatoes and oregano. Throw in some salt and pepper and a spoon of cumin if you feel like it. Simmer for ten minutes then add the lentils, juice and all, cover and simmer for another ten minutes until the carrots are tender. Ladle into an oven proof dish then spoon over the sweet potato mash until covered. Finally grate some cheddar over the top then pop into an oven preheated to 190 celsius/170 in a fan oven for 20 minutes

that was our variation because of some ingredient constraints but do feel free to try the real deal

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/4382/veggie-shepherds-pie-with-sweet-potato-mash

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It’s never too early for soup like

9 Aug

Ok so I know it’s warm outside and the evenings are still managing to stretch until eleven but I think it’s about time we considered the Autumn. Sooner or later scary signs are going to begin to appear. First it’ll be the odd brown leaf on a tree, or a miserable breeze that makes you wish you’d brought a jumper. Then before you know it the bikinis are gone from Penneys, replaced by coats and fleece lined boots. We can ignore it until we get stranded in a crazy rain shower wearing shorts and flip flops but the not so sunny season has arrived, at least according to the calendar (although really the weather is doing a pretty good job of killing the summer myth too with all the furious rain/sun presto changeo indecisiveness….stop it weather!). Before you go getting all depressed about what this means for you though, consider the up side to this shift in temperature- you know what I’m talking about, it’s soup season lovelies!

Yep for those of us self consciously sipping soup all summer, being ridiculed for our loyalty to that delicious hot food and feeling wretched for not embracing the season and eating salads and corn on the cob and things made of yogurt our time has arrived! At the first opportunity ie. when a lot of veg that we were unlikely to use had built up in the fridge I set about throwing together a soup so thick and warming that cold days would have nightmares about it. Here is the recipe for that day’s attempt, it’s rather spicy so do reduce the level of curry powder if  you’re more into flavour on the mild side :

1 fairly large sweet potato, peeled and cut into chunks

3 Carrots, peeled and cut into chunks

2/3 potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks

1 white onion, roughly chopped

1 leek, roughly chopped

1 tbsp curry powder

thumbnail sized chunk of ginger, grated

2 cloves of garlic, crushed

2 tsp cumin

1l chicken stock

tbsp oil

Start by heating the oil in a sauce pan, then throw in the garlic, onion and leek. Fry until soft then stir in the cumin, ginger and curry powder. Add the sweet potatoes, potatoes, carrots and stock and bring to the boil then turn down the heat, cover and simmer for twenty minutes until the vegetables are tender. At this point either allow the mixture to cool and puree it in a blender or leave it in the pan and use a hand blender. All going well you should end up with a lovely thick, spicy soup which you can keep in the fridge and reheat.